Tag Archives: digital divide

Sending an email in Uganda

One can only understand the meaning of the connectivity divide through experiencing it. Nothing as annoying as just simply waiting for something in order to find out that you have been waiting for nothing. But last week I was lucky. I tried to send an email in a hot and steamy Internet cafe in Kampala. This was a new experience for me. After first having tried my hotmail-account, which simply didn’t work, I gave my student-mail a shot. Minutes went by, but again without success. I got frustrated. The heat didn’t help. As a last resort I tried gmail.. and after another 10 minutes of trying and crying my email finally got sent. That was my first and last email that day. Continue reading

SNS Traffic Worldwide

Hopefully our joint research on ICT in Uganda and particularly my personal research-focus on internet use (see below) will add to this…I’m wondering: what colour will Uganda get?!

Click on image to enlarge

SNS Traffic Worldwide

Digital Divide: Citizen journalism in Africa

‘Bring the world to Africa and bring Africa to the world.’ (Gisel Hiscock, speaking at Surprising Africa)

Gisel Hiscock, one of speakers at the Surprising Africa conference, held a lecture about Google’s interest in giving information-access to the one billion Africans. The Africans need a way to share their information with the rest of the world: they need a voice. According to Hiscock the focus should be on developing technologies that answer local needs, empowering communities and in this way achieving the most. She finds Africa interesting because of it’s innovative character. Another speaker, Ethan Zuckerman, shares this interest: ‘A hammer isn’t a hammer in Africa. In the West a hammer is solely a tool to hit nails, in Africa they use it to do a lot more.’ Surely this is a necessity due to poverty, but nonetheless a capacity that has great potential in using new technologies. His presentation was far more interesting than the Google-presentation Hiscock came up with, since the latter seemed to be more interested in putting Google on a shiny pedestal instead of discussing relevant issues. Continue reading